IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference
15-18 April 2018 // Barcelona, Spain
Leading the Way to 5G and Beyond

Tutorials

  1. Massive MIMO – Fundamentals and State-of-the-Art by Emil Björnson, Jakob Hoydis, Luca Sanguinetti
  2. Ultra-Dense Networks: The Single-Antenna Case and the Multi-Antenna Case by David López-Pérez and Ming Ding
  3. Mobile Edge Computing by Yan Zhang, Rodrigo Roman and Xiaofei Wang
  4. Unlicensed Spectrum Technologies: From Wi-Fi to 5G and Beyond by Adrian Garcia-Rodriguez and Giovanni Geraci
  5. Channel Codes for Short Blocks: A Survey by Gianluigi Liva and Fabian Steiner
  6. Network Localization and Navigation: Fundamental limits, cooperative algorithms, and network experimentation by Moe Z. Win and Andrea Conti
  7. 5G-and-beyond V2X technologies and enablers: standards, research and solutions by Claudia Campolo, Antonella Molinaro, Antoine O. Berthet
  8. UAV Meets Wireless Communication in 5G and Beyond: Main Research Challenges and Key Enabling Techniques by Rui Zhang
  9. Spatiotemporal Stochastic Modeling for 5G and Beyond by Moe Win, Mohamed-Slim Alouini and Hesham ElSawy
  10. Communication and Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Power Transmission by Bruno Clerckx
  11. Polar coding: A new paradigm in channel coding by Ingmar Land, Jean-Claude Belfiore and Valerio Bioglio
  12. Disruptive Technologies and Tools for Flexible Wireless Interference Networks by Aydin Sezgin and Eduard Joerswick
  13. 5G Network Slicing: Concepts, Use Cases, Solutions & Practice by Marco Di Renzo, Konstantinos Samdanis, Vincenzo Sciancalepore and Fabrizio Granelli

 

  1. Massive MIMO – Fundamentals and State of the Art by Emil Björnson, Jakob Hoydis, Luca Sanguinetti
    The next generation of wireless networks needs to accommodate around 1000x larger data volumes and 50x more devices than current networks. Since the spectral resources are scarce, particularly in bands suitable for wide-area coverage, the main improvements need to come from a more aggressive spatial reuse of the spectrum; that is, many more concurrent transmissions are required per unit area. This can be achieved by the Massive MIMO technology, where the base stations are equipped with hundreds of antennas and can serve tens of users on each time-frequency resource through spatial multiplexing. The large number of antennas provides a great separation of users in the spatial domain, which is a paradigm shift from conventional multi-user technologies that mainly rely on user separation in the time or frequency domains.

    In recent years, Massive MIMO has gone from being a mind-blowing theoretical concept to one of the 5G-enabling technologies. Everybody seems to talk about Massive MIMO, but do they all mean the same thing? What is the canonical definition of Massive MIMO? What are the differences from the classical multi-user MIMO technology from the nineties? What are the key characteristics of the transmission protocol? How can Massive MIMO be deployed? Are there any widespread misunderstandings?

    This tutorial is given by the authors of "Massive MIMO Networks: Spectral, Energy, and Hardware Efficiency” (2017), the latest and most comprehensive book on the topic. A PDF of the book will be made available to the attendees. The tutorial will answer the questions listed above and other doubts that the attendees might have. We begin by covering the main motivation and properties of Massive MIMO in depth. Next, we describe basic communication theoretic results that are required to quantify the fundamental gains, behaviors, and limits of the technology. The second half of the tutorial provides a survey of the state-of-the-art regarding spectral efficiency, energy-efficient network design, and practical deployment strategies for Massive MIMO.

    Emil BjörnsonEmil Björnson has a 10‐years’ experience on multi‐user MIMO research. His expertise has been acknowledged by 5 best paper awards on multi‐user MIMO technology and by a handful of related patent applications. He received the Ph.D. degree from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, in 2011. From 2012 to July 2014, he was a postdoc at Supélec, France. He joined Linköping University, Sweden, in 2014 and is currently an Associate Professor at the Division of Communication Systems. Dr. Björnson received the 2014 Outstanding Young Researcher Award from IEEE ComSoc EMEA and the 2015 Ingvar Carlsson Award from the Swedish Foundation of Strategic Research. He is the first author of the magazine article “Massive MIMO: Ten Myths and One Critical Question” (2016) and the textbook “Optimal Resource Allocation in Coordinated Multi‐Cell Systems” (2013). He is dedicated to reproducible research and has made a large amount of simulation code publicly available. His research interests include multi‐antenna cellular communications, Massive MIMO technology, radio resource allocation, energy efficient networking, and hardware‐impaired communications. Since 2015 he is on the editorial board of IEEE JSAC ‐ Series on Green Communications and Networking.

    Jakob HoydisJakob Hoydis is a member of technical staff at Nokia Bell Labs, France. Previous to this position he was co‐founder and CTO of the social network SPRAED and worked for Alcatel‐Lucent Bell Labs in Stuttgart, Germany. He received the diploma degree (Dipl.‐Ing.) in electrical engineering and information technology from RWTH Aachen University, Germany, and the Ph.D. degree from Supélec, Gif‐sur‐Yvette, France, in 2008 and 2012, respectively. His research interests are in the areas of machine learning, cloud computing, SDR, large random matrix theory, information theory, signal processing and their applications to wireless communications. He is recipient of the 2012 Publication Prize of the Supélec Foundation, the 2013 VDE ITG Förderpreis, and the 2015 Leonard G. Abraham Prize of the IEEE COMSOC. He received the WCNC’2014 best paper award and has been nominated as an Exemplary Reviewer 2012 for the IEEE Communication letters.

    Luca SanguinettiLuca Sanguinetti is an Assistant Professor in the Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione of the University of Pisa. He received the Telecommunications Engineer degree (cum laude) and the Ph.D. degree in information engineering from the University of Pisa, Italy, in 2002 and 2005, respectively. In 2004, he was a visiting Ph.D. student at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. During the period June 2007 ‐ 2008, he was a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Princeton. Since July 2013, he is also with CentraleSupelec, Paris, France. He is serving as an Associate Editor for IEEE Trans. Wireless Commun. and IEEE Signal Process. Lett. He is the Lead Guest Associate Editor for IEEE JSAC ‐ Game Theory for Networks. From June 2015 to June 2016, he was in the editorial board of IEEE JSAC ‐ Series on Green Commun. and Networking. Dr. Sanguinetti served as Exhibit Chair of ICASSP14 and as the general co‐chair of the 2016 Tyrrhenian Workshop on 5G&Beyond. His expertise and general interests span the areas of communications and signal processing with special emphasis on multiuser MIMO, game theory and random matrix theory for wireless communications. He was the co‐recipient of 2 best paper awards: IEEE Wireless Commun. and Networking Conference (WCNC) 2013 and IEEE Wireless Commun. and Networking Conference (WCNC) 2014. He was also the recipient of the FP7 Marie Curie IEF 2013 “Dense deployments for green cellular networks”. Dr. Sanguinetti is a Senior IEEE Member.
  2. Ultra-Dense Networks: The Single-Antenna Case and the Multi-Antenna Case by David López-Pérez and Ming Ding
    In this tutorial, we will present the fundamental characteristics that define and differentiate an ultra-dense network (UDN) from the current 3G/4G sparse/dense networks, paying attention to both the single-antenna and multi-antenna case. For the single-antenna caseby investigating the performance metrics of coverage probability and area spectral efficiency (ASE), we will review the five key aspects of UDNs, i.e., the line of sight (LoS) interference, the low antenna height, the idle mode capability, the multi-user diversity loss and the implications of dynamic TDD. For the multi-antenna case, we will investigate the implication of multi-user MIMO and the optimal network deployment. More specifically, what is the optimal combination of the number of BSs and antennas per BS in a given area, when the antenna density (antennas/km2) is fixed?

    Ming DingMing Ding is a Senior Research Scientist at Data61 (previously known as NICTA), Australia. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees (with first class Hons.) in electronics engineering from Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU), Shanghai, China, and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in signal and information processing from SJTU, in 2004, 2007, and 2011, respectively. From September 2007 to September 2011, he pursued the Ph.D. degree at SJTU while at the same time working as a Researcher/Senior Researcher Sharp Laboratories of China (SLC). After achieving the Ph.D. degree, he continued working with SLC as a Senior Researcher/Principal Researcher until September 2014, when he joined National Information and Communications Technology Australia (NICTA), which was reorganized as Data61 in July 2016. He has authored about  50 papers in IEEE journals and conferences, all in recognized venues, and about 20 3GPP standardization contributions, as well as a Springer book Multi-point Cooperative Communication Systems: Theory and Applications. Also, as the first inventor, he holds 15 CN, 7 JP, 3 US, 2 KR patents and co-authored another 100+ patent applications on 4G/5G technologies. He served as the Algorithm Design Director and Programming Director for a system-level simulator of future telecommunication networks in SLC for more than 7 years. He is or has been Guest Editor/Co-Chair/Co-Tutor/TPC member of several IEEE top-tier journals/conferences, e.g., the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, the IEEE Communications Magazine, and the IEEE Globecom Workshops. For his inventions and publications, he was the recipient of the President’s Award of SLC in 2012, and served as one of the key members in the 4G/5G standardization team when it was awarded in 2014 as Sharp Company Best Team: LTE 2014 Standardization Patent Portfolio.

    David López-PérezDavid López-Pérez is currently a member of Technical Staff at Nokia Bell Laboratories. Prior to this, David received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in telecommunication from Miguel Hernandez University, Spain, in 2003 and 2006, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in wireless networking from the University of Bedfordshire, U.K., in 2011. David was also a RF Engineer with Vodafone, Spain, from 2005 to 2006, and a Research Associate with King’s College London, U.K., from 2010 to 2011. David has authored the book Heterogeneous Cellular Networks: Theory, Simulation and Deployment (Cambridge University Press, 2012), as well as over 90 book chapters, journal, and conference papers, all in recognized venues. He also holds over 30 patents applications. David received the Ph.D. Marie-Curie Fellow in 2007, and was a finalist for the Scientist of the Year prize in The Irish Laboratory Awards in 2013 and 2015. He is an editor of IEEE TRANSACTION on WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS since 2016 and he was an Exemplary Reviewer of the IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS in 2011. He is or has also been a Guest Editor of a number of journals, e.g., the IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED AREAS IN COMMUNICATIONS and the IEEE Communication Magazine.
  3. Mobile Edge Computing by Yan Zhang, Rodrigo Roman and Xiaofei Wang
    Mobile Edge Computing (MEC) is an emerging communications and computing paradigm and an essential technology in the next-generation 5G systems. In MEC, resources are push close to radio access networks and end-users. This can unfold numerous advantages to deal with explosive data in the wireless big data era. In this tutorial, we will first introduce the key concepts related to MEC, e.g., edge computing, and mobile cloud computing. Then, we will focus on the research challenges and solutions in MEC for 5G, including the architectures, the main principles, and the techniques (e.g., edge caching, traffic offloading). Following this, we will present the recent studies on MEC for Internet of Things (IoT), e.g., MEC for vehicular networks. Next, we will introduce the security and privacy challenges that affect MEC ecosystems, alongside with the security mechanisms that are being considered by existing architectures and the academia. Finally, we will summarize the tutorial and point out several open issues.

    Yan ZhangYan Zhang is Full Professor in the Department of Informatics at University of Oslo, Norway. He received a PhD degree in School of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He is an Associate Technical Editor of IEEE Communications Magazine, an Editor of IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking, an Editor of IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, and an Associate Editor of IEEE Access. He also serves as the guest editor for IEEE Communications Magazine, IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine, IEEE Network Magazine, IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing, IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics, IEEE Systems Journal, and IEEE Internet of Things journal. He serves as chair positions in a number of conferences, including IEEE GLOBECOM 2017, IEEE PIMRC 2016, IEEE CCNC 2016, WICON 2016, IEEE SmartGridComm 2015, and IEEE CloudCom 2015. He serves as TPC member for numerous international conference including IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE ICC, IEEE GLOBECOM, and IEEE WCNC. His current research interests include: next-generation wireless networks leading to 5G, reliable and secure cyber-physical systems (e.g., smart grid, healthcare, and transport), Internet-of-Things, economic approaches (e.g., game theory) for networks performance optimization. He is IEEE VTS (Vehicular Technology Society) Distinguished Lecturer during 2016-2018. He is also a senior member of IEEE, IEEE CS, IEEE PES, IEEE ComSoc, and IEEE VT society.

    Rodrigo RomanRodrigo Roman holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and a M.Sc. in Computer Science Engineering. He is currently working as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Malaga, Spain. His current research interests include various areas related to Internet of Things security and Fog Computing security. Dr. Roman has published numerous articles in the topic of IoT security in several international conferences and journals, and has recently published one of the most downloaded and cited articles on the topic of MEC and Fog security. Dr. Roman served as a chair of one of the first IoT security workshops (SecIoT), and serves as a TPC member for numerous international conferences. Moreover, Dr. Roman has participated in the development of several successful Spanish and European project proposals in various fields, like embedded peer-to-peer systems (SMEPP), Internet of Things (SPRINT), and digital home networks (FEEL@HOME), amongst others. Currently Dr. Roman is working in Spanish research projects related to Fog Computing security (SMOG) and Industry 4.0 security (SADCIP). He is also a member of the IEEE society.

    Xiaofei WangXiaofei Wang, holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and M.S. in Computer Science and Engineering. He is currently a full professor in Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tianjin University, China. His research topics include next generation 5G mobile network, future network architecture and mobile social network. He has led/participated in 10 research projects in South Korea, Canada, and China. He has published 60+ papers in international journal in IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, IEEE Communications, IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, IEEE Network, IEEE INFOCOM and so on. Prof. Xiaofei Wang has awarded the 2017 IEEE Communications Society Fred W. Ellersick Prize, for its excellence on edge caching: "Cache in the Air: Exploiting Content Caching and Delivery Techniques for 5G Systems”, IEEE Communications Magazine, Volume 52, Issue 2, Page 131 -139, February 2014." The awarded paper is regarded as the milestone in the area of mobile edge caching and offloading, with high citation.
  4. Unlicensed Spectrum Technologies: From Wi-Fi to 5G and Beyond by Adrian Garcia-Rodriguez and Giovanni Geraci
    A broad range of new technologies are being developed as mobile operators eye the unlicensed spectrum to address the exponential traffic growth. The omnipresent Wi-Fi is being upgraded to its latest flavour (802.11ax) to support uplink multi-user MIMO and achieve higher user throughputs. Moreover, Wi-Fi systems operating in the mmWave frequencies (802.11ad) are commencing to be commercially deployed to avail of a wider bandwidth. Meanwhile, LTE-WLAN aggregation (LWA) efficiently realizes licensed/unlicensed spectrum bundling through the 3GPP dual connectivity framework, whereas LTE Unlicensed and License Assisted Access (LAA) employ a native LTE carrier aggregation technology. The newly standardized MulteFire technology also builds upon LTE but does not even require a licensed carrier anchor, allowing stand-alone unlicensed operations and attracting a new class of wireless providers. Forward-looking Massive MIMO Unlicensed features the capability of placing radiation nulls towards neighboring nodes, boosting spatial reuse and enhancing coexistence. In this tutorial, we will cover in detail — and provide a better understanding of — current and recently proposed unlicensed technologies. On the basis of their key principles, we will identify the rich research opportunities and tackle the fundamental challenges that arise when operating in the unlicensed spectrum.

    Adrian Garcia-RodriguezAdrian Garcia-Rodriguez received the MSc degree in telecommunications engineering from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain, in 2012, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical and electronic engineering from University College London, London, U.K., in 2016. He has held research positions in the research institute for technological development and Communication Innovation (IDeTIC) at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, between 2010-2012, and in the RF group of Nokia Bell Labs, Dublin, Ireland, in 2015. Since 2016, he is a post-doctoral researcher in the Small Cells Team of Nokia Bell Labs, Dublin, Ireland. His research interests include signal processing for wireless communications with emphasis on massive MIMO communications, unlicensed spectrum technologies, heterogeneous networks and energy-efficient communications. He is co-inventor of several patent applications for wireless communication systems operating in the unlicensed spectrum. Adrian was named an Exemplary Reviewer for IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS in 2016.

    Giovanni GeraciGiovanni Geraci was born in Sicily, Italy. He received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in telecommunications engineering from Università di Palermo and from Politecnico di Milano, Italy, in 2005 and 2009, respectively. He earned the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, in 2014. Since 2016, Giovanni is a Research Scientist at Nokia Bell Labs, Dublin, Ireland. Prior to joining Bell Labs, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore, between 2014-2015. He has also held research appointments at the University of Texas at Austin, USA, in 2013, at Supelec, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, in 2012, and at Alcatel-Lucent, Vimercate, Italy, in 2009. His research interests cover various aspects of wireless communications, networking, and signal processing, currently focusing on heterogeneous networks, small cells, massive MIMO systems, and unlicensed spectrum technologies. Giovanni has published around 40 between book chapters, journal articles, and conference papers, all in recognized venues, and he is co-inventor of several patent applications on wireless communication networks.
  5. Channel Codes for Short Blocks: A Survey by Gianluigi Liva and Fabian Steiner
    The emergence of applications requiring low-latency and ultra-reliable communication protocols (internet of things, machine type communications) points to the need of efficient and robust short forward error correction codes. The design of block codes for short information blocks (e.g., a thousand or less information bits) is an open research problem which is gaining relevance thanks to emerging applications in wireless communication networks. Further, to meet the increasing spectral efficiency demands, higher order modulation and probabilistic shaping are also gaining broad attention. In this tutorial, we review some of the most recent code constructions targeting the short block regime, and we compare them with both finite-length performance bounds and classical error correction coding schemes. We will see how it is possible to effectively approach the theoretical bounds with different performance vs. decoding complexity trade-offs. In particular, we also highlight the challenges in code design that come into play with higher order modulation. Finally, the tutorial features our recently launched website http://pretty-good-codes.org, which allows the participants to interactively follow and reproduce the results shown in the tutorial via their mobile phones and tablets.

    Gianluigi LivaGianluigi Liva received the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Bologna (Italy) in 2002 and 2006, respectively. Since 2003 he has been investigating channel codes for high data rate CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Sys- tems) missions, in collaboration with the European Space Operations Centre of the European Space Agency (ESA-ESOC). From October 2004 to April 2005 he was researching at the University of Arizona in Tucson, where he was designing low-complexity error correcting codes for space communications. Since 2006 he is with the Institute of Communications and Navigation at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), where he currently leads the Information Transmission group. In 2010 he has been appointed lecturer for channel coding at the Institute for Communicationsqq Engineering (LNT), Technische Universität München (TUM). In 2012 and 2013 he has been lecturing for channel coding at the Nanjing University of Science and Technology (China). Since 2014 he is lecturer for channel codes with iterative decoding at the Institute for Communications Engineering (LNT), Technische Universität München (TUM). His main research interests include satellite communications, random access techniques and error control coding. He is/has been active in the DVB-SH, DVB-RCS and DVB-S2 standardization groups, as well as in the standardization of error correcting codes for deep-space communications within the CCSDS.

    Fabian SteinerFabian Steiner was born in Prien am Chiemsee, Germany. He received the B.Sc. degree and M.Sc. degree (with high distinction) in electrical engineering from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), Germany, in 2011 and 2014, respectively. He is now working toward the Ph.D. degree at the Institute for Communications Engineering, TUM. He is supervised by Dr. Georg Böcherer and Prof. Gerhard Kramer. His current research interest include coding, modulation and multi- user massive MIMO systems. He received the Prof. Dr. Ralf Kötter memorial award for his master’s thesis and won the third prize of the 2015 Bell Labs Prize with his proposal on probabilistic shaping for capacity achieving and rate adaptive communication.
  6. Network Localization and Navigation: Fundamental limits, cooperative algorithms, and network experimentation by Moe Z. Win and Andrea Conti
    The availability of real-time high-accuracy location awareness is essential for current and future wireless applications, particularly for the Internet of Things and 5G networks. Reliable localization and navigation is a critical component for various applications including connected communities, smart environments, vehicle autonomy, home automation, asset tracking, medical services, military systems, and wireless sensor networks. The coming years will see the emergence of network localization and navigation in challenging environments with sub-meter accuracy and minimal infrastructure requirements. We will cover fundamental bounds, cooperative algorithms, operation strategies, and network experimentation. Fundamental bounds serve as performance benchmark, and as a tool for network design. Cooperative algorithms are a way to achieve drastic performance improvements with respect to traditional non-cooperative positioning. To harness these benefits, system designers must develop operation strategies. Network experimentation are essential to compare different cooperative algorithms under common settings. This tutorial aims to provide researchers and practitioners with rigorous, yet concise treatment of network localization and navigation.

    Moe WinMoe Win is a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to joining MIT, he was at AT&T Research Laboratories for five years and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for seven years. His research encompasses fundamental theories, algorithm design, and experimentation for a broad range of real-world problems. His current research topics include network localization and navigation, network interference exploitation, intrinsic wireless secrecy, adaptive diversity techniques, ultrawide bandwidth systems, optical transmission systems, and space communications systems. Professor Win is an elected Member-at-Large on the IEEE Communications Society Board of Governors (2011-2013). He was the Chair (2005-2006) and Secretary (2003-2004) for the Radio Communications Committee of the IEEE Communications Society. Dr. Win is currently an Editor-at-Large for the WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS. He served as Editor (2006–2012) for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, and as Area Editor (2003–2006) and Editor (1998–2006) for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS. He was honored with two IEEE Technical Field Awards: the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award and the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. He received the IEEE Communications Society Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award, the International Prize for Communications Cristoforo Colombo, Copernicus Fellowship, the Royal Academy of Engineering Distinguished Visiting Fellowship, the Fulbright Fellowship, the Laurea Honoris Causa from the University of Ferrara, the Technical Recognition Award of the IEEE ComSoc Radio Communications Committee, and the U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Professor Win is elected Fellow of the AAAS, the IEEE, and the IET, and was an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer.

    Andrea ContiAndrea Conti is an Associate Professor at the University of Ferrara. He was researcher at CNIT (1999–2002) and at IEIIT/CNR (2002–2005) with the Research Unit of Bologna. In Summer 2001, he was with the Wireless Systems Research Department at AT&T Research Laboratories. Since 2003, he has been a frequent visitor to the Wireless Communication and Network Sciences Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he presently holds the Research Affiliate appointment. He is a coauthor of Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks: Enabling Technologies, Information Processing and Protocol Design (Elsevier, 2008). His research interests involve theory and experimentation of wireless systems and networks including network localization and navigation, adaptive diversity communications, network secrecy, and random sampling. He is recipient of the HTE Puskás Tivadar Medal and co-recipient of the IEEE Communications Society’s Stephen O. Rice Prize and the IEEE Communications Society’s Fred W. Ellersick Prize. Dr. Conti served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS, for the IEEE WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, and for the for the IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS. He organized and chaired a number of IEEE conferences. He was elected Chair (2013-2014), Vice-Chair (2011-2012), and Secretary (2009-2010) of the IEEE Communications Society’s Radio Communications Technical Committee. He is an elected Fellow of the IET and has been selected as an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer.
  7. 5G-and-beyond V2X technologies and enablers: standards, research and solutions by Claudia Campolo, Antonella Molinaro, Antoine O. Berthet
    Vehicle-to-Everything (V2X) communication is the key for a safer, greener, smarter, more connected and autonomous transport. Worldwide initiatives pushed by ICT players and vehicle manufacturers, are currently running that witness the V2X hot topicality. Indeed, the automotive vertical market is an undoubted main driver of 5G systems and beyond, with its unique features in terms of heterogeneity of end users, stakeholders, and technologies, its diversified use cases, challenging application demands and still unsolved issues. The tutorial will overview the main past, latest and ongoing progress in the V2X-related research, development and standardization activities. The lessons learnt after decades of work with Dedicated short range communication (DSRC) and ETSI ITS standards, relying on IEEE 802.11 as V2X access technology, will be first presented. Then, 3GPP enhancements for Cellular-V2X (C-V2X) communications (e.g., over the PC5 and Uu interfaces) will be presented, as under discussion in Releases 14 and 15, along with the most significant results from the literature and the presenters background. Cutting-edge technologies towards network softwarization/virtualization will be shortly discussed as key 5G network slicing enablers for V2X. A final insight will be provided into the V2X use of other bands (e.g., mmWave, visible light) and innovative transceiver design (e.g., new modulations and access techniques, full-duplexing). Key challenges and future research opportunities in this intriguing topic will engage the attendees in fruitful discussions.

    Antonella MolinaroAntonella Molinaro is an Associate professor of Telecommunications at the University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Italy. She was with the University of Messina (1998-2001) and the University of Calabria (2001-2004) as an assistant professor; with the Polytechnic of Milano as a research fellow (1997-1998); and with Siemens A.G., Munich, Germany as a CEC fellow in the RACE-II program (1994-1995). She graduated in Computer Engineering (1991) at the University of Calabria, received a Master degree in Information Technology from CEFRIEL/Polytechnic of Milano (1992), and a Ph.D. degree in Multimedia Technologies and Communications Systems (1996). Her research mainly focuses on vehicular networks, 5G, information-centric networking, IoT. She was co-editor of the book “Vehicular ad hoc Networks: Standards, Solutions, and Research”, Springer, 2015; guest editor of a special issue on Vehicular Networking for Mobile Crowd Sensing, in Ad Hoc Networks, 2015, tutorial instructor in IEEE WCNC 2012, IEEE ICC 2017 and EUCNC 2017, and keynote speaker in AdHocNow 2016.

    Claudia CampoloClaudia Campolo is an Assistant Professor of Telecommunications at University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Italy. She received a Laurea degree in Telecommunications Engineering (2007) and a PhD degree (2011) from the University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Italy. In 2008 she was a visiting PhD student at Politecnico di Torino and a DAAD fellow at University of Paderborn, Germany in 2015. Her main research interests are in the field of vehicular networking and future Internet architectures. She has received three best paper awards for research in the vehicular networking field and the IEEE ComSoc EMEA Outstanding Young Researcher Award in 2015. She is involved in the organization of many international conferences and she gave tutorial at IEEE WCNC 2012, IEEE ICC 2017 and EUCNC 2017. She was co-editor of the book “Vehicular ad hoc network: standards, solutions and research”, Springer-Verlag 2015, and Guest Editor of the special issue on Multi-radio, Multi-technology, Multi-system Vehicular Communications”, in Computer Communications, 2016.

    Antoine O. BerthetAntoine O. Berthet is a Full Professor at CentraleSupélec, Gif-sur-Yvette, France and a CNRS researcher. He received his engineer’s degree from Télécom SudParis, évry, France, in 1997; his M.Sc. degree in signal processing from Télécom ParisTech, France, in 1997; his Ph.D. degree in computer science, electronics, and telecommunications from the University Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), Paris, France, in 2001; his Ph.D. degree in computer science from Télécom ParisTech in 2001; and his HDR degree from UPMC in 2007. From January 1998 to October 2000, he was with France Telecom R&D. From October 2000 to October 2001, he joined Alcatel Space Industries and worked on high data rate modem design for satellites. Since 2001, he has been with Supélec (now CentraleSupélec). His research work, based on information theory, coding theory, and signal processing for telecommunications, with application to the physical layers of satellite, cellular, and vehicular networks.
  8. UAV Meets Wireless Communication in 5G and Beyond: Main Research Challenges and Key Enabling Techniques by Rui Zhang
    The integration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) into future generation wireless networks calls for a paradigm shift on the design of existing cellular systems, to enable a highly heterogeneous network with not only terrestrial users and base stations (BSs), but also aerial users and communication platforms at altitude varying from tens of meters to several kilometers. In particular, both paradigms of cellular-connected UAV communication and UAV-assisted terrestrial communication are promising, which are dramatically different from the conventional terrestrial communications, due to the high altitude and mobility of UAVs, the unique channel characteristics of UAV-ground links, the asymmetric quality of service (QoS) requirements for downlink command and control (C&C) and uplink mission-related payload transmission, the stringent constraints imposed by the size, weight, and power (SWAP) limitations of UAVs, as well as the new design degrees of freedom by exploiting the UAV controlled mobility. Significant research efforts from both academia and industry have been devoted to exploring this exciting new field, with remarkable progress made, especially in the past couple of years. The aim of this tutorial is thus to provide a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art findings, major research challenges and key enabling technologies for integrating UAVs into 5G and beyond. Promising directions for future research will also be highlighted.

    Rui ZhangRui Zhang received the B.Eng. (First-Class Hons.) and M.Eng. degrees from National University of Singapore, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, Stanford, CA USA, all in electrical engineering. From 2007 to 2009, he worked as a Research Scientist at the Institute for Infocomm Research, ASTAR, Singapore. Since 2010, he has joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of National University of Singapore, where he is now an Associate Professor and Dean’s Chair Professor in the Faculty of Engineering. His current research interests include UAV communications, wireless information and power transfer, MIMO communications, etc. He has published over 270 papers, which have been cited more than 17,000 times. He has been listed as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters since 2015. He was the recipient of the 6th IEEE Communications Society Asia-Pacific Region Best Young Researcher Award in 2011, and the Young Researcher Award of National University of Singapore in 2015. He was the co-recipient of the IEEE Marconi Prize Paper Award in Wireless Communications in 2015, the IEEE Communications Society Asia-Pacific Region Best Paper Award in 2016, the IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award in 2016, and the IEEE Communications Society Heinrich Hertz Prize Paper Award in 2017. He served for over 30 international conferences as TPC Co-Chair or Organizing Committee Members, and as the guest editor for 8 special issues in IEEE and other international journals. He served as an elected member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society SPCOM and SAM Technical Committees, and the Vice Chair of the IEEE Communications Society Asia-Pacific Board Technical Affairs Committee. He served as an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications (Green Communications and Networking Series). He is now an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications, the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, and the IEEE Transactions on Green Communications and Networking.
  9. Spatiotemporal Stochastic Modeling for 5G and Beyond by Moe Win, Mohamed-Slim Alouini and Hesham ElSawy
    Massive wireless networks (MWN), constituted of ultra-dense base stations, WiFi access points, sensors, actuators, machines, connected cars, drones, devices, and many other smart objects (things) will significantly contribute to the big data supply and automation of the foreseen smart world. Realizing such massive wireless connectivity is an important foundation for the 5G, Internet-of-Things (IoT), and Cyber Physical Systems (CPS). Unleashing the potentials of the upcoming smart world necessitates revolutionary designs and methodologies for wireless networking in order to cope with the unprecedented challenges imposed by the MWN intrinsic characteristics. In particular, such networks are foreseen to emerge in different sectors (e.g., smart cities, public safety, health-care, autonomous driving, etc.), having distinct spatial (e.g., wide-spread topology and massively many nodes), temporal (e.g., sporadic traffic patterns and battery level), and contextual (e.g., heterogeneous devices and diverse applications) aspects. To efficiently design MWN, rigorous mathematical models that capture the essences of these networks are required. In this context, this tutorial presents spatiotemporal mathematical framework, based on stochastic geometry and queueing theory, as a fundamental basis to model and analyze 5G networks and beyond. The theoretical foundations will then be used to design new technologies/services for 5G and beyond. To this end, several research directions will be discussed in the context of IoT, CPS, and 5G systems. To this end, several research directions will be discussed in the context of IoT, CPS, and 5G systems.

    Moe WingMoe Win is a Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Prior to joining MIT, he was at AT&T Research Laboratories for five years and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for seven years. His research encompasses fundamental theories, algorithm design, and experimentation for a broad range of real-world problems. His current research topics include network  localization and navigation, network interference exploitation, intrinsic wireless secrecy, adaptive diversity techniques, ultra-wide bandwidth systems, optical transmission systems, and space communications systems. Professor Win is an elected Member-at-Large on the IEEE Communications Society Board of Governors (2011-2013). He was the Chair (2005-2006) and Secretary  (2003-2004) for the Radio Communications Committee of the IEEE Communications Society. Dr. Win is currently an Editor-at-Large for the Wireless Communications Letters. He served as Editor (2006–2012) for the IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications, and as Area Editor (2003–2006) and Editor (1998–2006) for the IEEE Transactions on Communications. He was honored with two IEEE Technical Field Awards: the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award and the IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. He received the IEEE Communications Society Edwin H. Armstrong Achievement Award, the International Prize for Communications Cristoforo Colombo, Copernicus Fellowship, the Royal Academy of Engineering Distinguished Visiting Fellowship, the Fulbright Fellowship, the Laurea Honoris Causa from the University of Ferrara, the Technical Recognition Award of the IEEE ComSoc Radio Communications Committee, and the U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Professor Win is elected Fellow of the AAAS, the IEEE, and the IET, and was an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer.

    Mohamed-Slim AlouiniMohamed-Slim Alouini received the Diplome d'Ingenieur from the école Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications (TELECOM Paris Tech) and the Diplome d'Etudes Approfondies (D.E.A.) in Electronics with Highest Honors from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in Paris, both in 1993. He received the M.S.E.E. degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in 1995, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1998. He also received the Habilitation  degree from the Université Pierre et Marie Curie in 2003. Dr. Alouini served as a faculty member in the University of  Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA, then in the Texas A&M University at Qatar, Education City, Doha, Qatar before joining King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Makkah Province, Saudi Arabia as a Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2009. His current research interests include design and performance analysis of diversity combining techniques, MIMO techniques, multihop/cooperative  communications systems, optical wireless communication systems, cognitive radio systems, and multi-resolution, hierarchical and adaptive modulation schemes. Dr. Alouini has published several papers on the above subjects, and he is co-author of the textbook Digital Communication over Fading Channels published by Wiley Interscience. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a member of the Thomson ISI Web of Knowledge list of Highly Cited Researchers as well as the list of Most Cited Researchers Developed for Shanghai Ranking's Global Ranking of Academic Subjects 2016 by Elsevier, an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Communication Society, and a corecipient of best paper awards in ten IEEE conferences (including ICC, GLOBECOM, VTC, PIMRC, and DySPAN).

    Hesham ElSawyHesham ElSawy joined the Computer, Electrical, and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division, of the King Abdullah University of Science and technology (KAUST), as a postdoctoral fellow in April 2014. He also has an adjunct affiliation to the school of Computer Science and Engineering, York University, Canada. Dr. ElSawy obtained his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Manitoba,  innipeg, MB Canada, in 2014. During his PhD studies, he worked with TRTech in Winnipeg, as Student Researcher. For his academic excellence, he has received several academic awards, including the Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Industrial Postgraduate Scholarship (NSERC-IPS). Dr. ElSawy is an IEEE Senior Member and is a recipient of the IEEE COMSOC best survey paper award 2017, the best scientific contribution award to the International Symposium of Wireless Communications Systems (ISWCS) 2017, and the best paper award in ICC 2015 small cells and 5G networks workshop. He is also distinguished by the IEEE Transactions on Communication as an exemplary reviewer in 2015, 2016 & 2017. His research interests include statistical modeling of wireless networks, stochastic geometry, and queueing analysis for wireless  communication networks.
  10. Communication and Signal Processing Advances in Wireless Power Transmission by Bruno Clerckx
    Microwave wireless power transfer (WPT) is a promising technology to provide cost-effective and real-time power supplies to wireless devices. Although microwave WPT shares many similar characteristics with the extensively studied wireless information transfer or communication, they also differ significantly in terms of design objectives, transmitter/receiver architectures and hardware constraints, etc. In this tutorial, we first give an overview on the various WPT technologies, the historical development of the microwave WPT technology and the main challenges in designing contemporary microwave WPT systems. Then, we focus on discussing the new communication and signal processing techniques that can be applied to tackle these challenges. Topics discussed include energy harvester modelling, energy beamforming for WPT, channel acquisition, power region characterization in multi-user WPT, waveform design with linear and non-linear energy receiver model, safety and health issues of WPT, massive MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output) and wireless power and communication systems co-design. We also point out directions that are promising for future research.

    Bruno ClerckxBruno Clerckx is a Reader (Associate Professor) in the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department at Imperial College London (London, United Kingdom). He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degree in applied science from the Université catholique de Louvain (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) in 2000 and 2005, respectively. From 2006 to 2011, he was with Samsung Electronics (Suwon, South Korea) where he actively contributed to 3GPP LTE/LTE-A and IEEE 802.16m and acted as the rapporteur for the 3GPP Coordinated Multi-Point (CoMP) Study Item. Since 2011, he has been with Imperial College London, first as a Lecturer (2011- 2015), then as a Senior Lecturer (2015-2017), and now as a Reader. From March 2014 to March 2016, he also occupied an Associate Professor position at Korea University, Seoul, Korea. He also held visiting research appointments at Stanford University, EURECOM, National University of Singapore and The University of Hong Kong. He is the author of 2 books, 130 peer-reviewed international research papers, 150 standard contributions and the inventor of 75 issued or pending patents among which 15 have been adopted in the specifications of 4G (3GPP LTE/LTE-A and IEEE 802.16m) standards. Dr. Clerckx served as an editor for IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS from 2011-2015 and is currently an editor for IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS. He is an Elected Member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society SPCOM Technical Committee. His research area is communication theory and signal processing for wireless networks.
  11. Polar coding: A new paradigm in channel coding by Ingmar Land, Jean-Claude Belfiore and Valerio Bioglio
    The discovery of the channel polarization phenomenon made by Arikan in 2008 has introduced a new paradigm in channel coding. Successive cancellation (list) decoding of Polar codes exhibits good performance compared to turbo codes and LDPC codes under iterative decoding. Initially seen as a research topic, Polar codes broke out of academia into the communication industry, to such an extent that, along with LDPC codes, in late 2016 they were accepted within the 5G standardization for the eMBB channel. This tutorial, after a brief revision on the theoretic principles of channel polarization, will provide a practical approach of the design and decoding of polar codes, paving the way for the comprehension of the ideas behind the 5G polar coding standardisation process.

    Ingmar LandIngmar Land has joined the Huawei French Research Centre in December 2014 and is heading the Communication Algorithms Design. Previously he was Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Telecommunications Research, University of South Australia, from 2007 to 2014, and Assistant Professor at Aalborg University, Denmark, from 2005 to 2006. He received his Dr.-Ing. (summa cum laude) in 2004 from the University of Kiel, Germany, and studied for his Dipl.-Ing. at the University of Ulm and the University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany. He was recipient of four competitive research grants from the Australian Research Council. He has more than 60 scientific publications, including journal and conference papers, one book and one book chapter, and he holds several patents. He is Associate Editor of IEEE Wireless Communication Letters and has been on the TPC of leading international conferences on a regular basis. His main research interests are coding and information theory for future networks, with application to multi-user communications, cooperative communications, physical-layer security, and to distributed storage.

    Jean-Claude BelfioreJean-Claude Belfiore is Head of the Communication Science Department at the Huawei Mathematical and Algorithmic Sciences Lab and professor at Telecom ParisTech. He received his MSc from Supelec and his PhD from ENST. In 1989, he was enrolled at ENST (now Telecom ParisTech), where he became full Professor in the Communications & Electronics department, in charge of research activities in the areas of digital communications, information theory and coding. Jean-Claude Belfiore has made pioneering contributions on modulation and coding for wireless systems (especially space-time coding) by using tools of number theory. He is also one of the co-inventors of the celebrated Golden Code. He is now working on wireless network coding, coding for physical security, coding for interference channels and more generally on lattice coding problems for multi-terminal communications. He is author or co-author of more than 200 technical papers and communications and he has served as advisor for more than 30 Ph.D. students. Prof. Belfiore has been the recipient of the 2007 Blondel Medal. He has been Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory for Coding Theory.

    Valerio BioglioValerio Bioglio has joined the Huawei French Research Centre in January 2015 as Researcher for the Team Coding for Data Networks. Previously he joined the CRISP Team as a Post-doc Researcher at the Telecommunication Department, Politecnico of Torino. He obtained his BSc in Mathematics from Università degli Studi di Torino (Italy) in 2006. He obtained her MSc in Applied Mathematics from Università degli Studi di Torino (Italy) in 2008. He completed his PhD in Computer Science at the Computer Science Department of the Università degli Studi di Torino (Italy) in 2012. His main research interests are information theory, communication theory and signal processing with focus on mathematical modeling. His publications include papers on rateless codes, network coding, P2P streaming, game theory for cooperative communications, codes for caching and distributed storage, compressed sensing, image processing. He further has extensive experience in student supervision, teaching and scientific vulgarisation. His current research interests lie in the field of 5G communication systems, with application to distributed storage, caching, and polar codes.
  12. Disruptive Technologies and Tools for Flexible Wireless Interference Networks by Aydin Sezgin and Eduard Joerswick
    Wireless communications has transformed the life of societies significantly during its short time of its existence. In order to keep this momentum running, wireless networks have to overcome severe challenges in the future. First, it is expected that the number of devices equipped with wireless modules will exceed 50 billions by 2020. These devices have to be able to exchange information in an environment where lots of nodes are active at the same time and within the same frequency bands due to limited spectral resources leading to an interference limited scenario. Moreover, flexible ways of handling the scarce resource spectrum for interference management lead to novel dense and dynamic networks. Further, the exchange of information is expected to be bidirectional, that is, a device will act as a source and a sink simultaneously. Thus new topologies such as, for instance, multi-hop networks, multi-way networks, X networks will arise or will play a more dominant role in next generation wireless systems. In order to tackle those challenges networks are facing, new disruptive technologies and concepts are necessary which mitigate the impact of impairments and exploit the available resources in a way superior to traditional approaches. Additionally, this has to be achieved with low complexity, low cost and high overall efficiency. The present tutorial provides the audience with a complete survey of the potential benefits, research challenges, implementation efforts and application of technologies and protocols on modern interference management, including the mathematical tools for their modeling, analysis and optimization. This tutorial is unique of its kind, as it tackles both information theoretical analysis, signal processing, and optimization aspects which are usually treated independently. The tutorial has copious illustrations with a minimum mathematical content. The aim is to build intuition and insight into the important topics of interference management while leaving the technical details to references. The tutorial is based on the experience of the instructors accumulated over several years of cooperation with both academia and industry. This experience combined with solid theoretical background will help participants to better understand important theoretical concepts and their application and impact on the practical wireless system design.

    Aydin SezginAydin Sezgin was born in 1975 in Kemah, Anatolia. He received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.S.) degree in communications engineering and the Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.) degree in electrical engineering from the TFH Berlin in 2000 and the TU Berlin, in 2005, respectively. From 2001 to 2006, he was with the Heinrich-Hertz-Institut (HHI), Berlin. From  2006  to  2008, he was a Post-doc and Lecturer at the Information Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University. From 2008 to 2009, he was a Post-doc at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California Irvine. From 2009 to 2011, he was the Head of the Emmy-Noether-Research Group on Wireless Networks at the Ulm University. In 2011, he was professor at TU Darmstadt, Germany. He is currently a professor of Information Systems and Sciences at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. Aydin is interested in signal processing, communication and information theory with focus on wireless networks. He has published several book chapters, more than 40 journal and 140 conference papers on these topics. He has co-authored a book on multi-way communications. He served as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications 2009-2014. Aydin is the winner of the ITG-sponsorship award in 2006. He is the first recipient of the prestigious Emmy- Noether grant by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in communication engineering in 2009. He has co-authored a paper that received the best poster award at the IEEE Comm. Theory Workshop in 2011. He has also co-authored a paper that received the best paper award at ICCSPA in 2015.

    Eduard A. JorswieckEduard A. Jorswieck was born in 1975 in Berlin, Germany. He received his M.S. degree and  Ph.D.  degree, both in electrical engineering and  computer  science  from the Technische Universita¨t Berlin, Germany, in 2000 and 2004, respectively. He was with the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich-Hertz-Institut (HHI) Berlin, in the Broadband Mobile Communication Networks Department from December 2000  to  February  2008.  From  April  2005 until February 2008, he was a lecturer at the Technische Universita¨t Berlin. From February 2006 until February 2008, he worked for the Department of Signals, Sensors and Systems at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) as a post-doc and Assistant Professor. Since February 2008, he has been the head of the Chair of Communications Theory and Full Professor at Dresden University of Technology (TUD), Germany. Eduard’s main research interests are in the area of signal processing for communications and networks, applied infor- mation theory, and communications theory. He has published more than 100 journal papers, more than 250 conference papers, 3 monographs, and 11 book chapters papers on these topics, and has filed 5 patents. Dr. Jorswieck is senior member of IEEE. Since 2017, he has been serving as Editor-in-Chief for the EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking. He has been a member of the IEEE SPCOM Technical Committee from 2008 to 2013. Since 2015, he is elected member of the IEEE SAM TC. From 2011 to 2015, he acted as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing. Since 2008, continuing until 2011, he has served as an Associate Editor for IEEE Signal Processing Letters. From 2012 until 2013 he served as Senior Associate Editor for IEEE Signal Processing Letter. Since 2013, he serves as Editor for IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications. Since 2016, he serves as Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security. In 2006, he received the IEEE Signal Processing Society Best Paper Award.
  13. 5G Network Slicing: Concepts, Use Cases, Solutions & Practice by Marco Di Renzo, Konstantinos Samdanis, Vincenzo Sciancalepore and Fabrizio Granelli
    Our tutorial focuses on the evolutionary flow of the network virtualization and network slicing operations through several standard definition activities in the last decade. In particular, we shed light on how network slicing operations become feasible in the next generation mobile networks by boiling down the overall overhead and complexity of a full network deployment. We analyze the state-of-the-art solutions proposed to realize the first example of network slicing, highlighting the hardware limitations of the current solutions and the real potentiality of advanced virtualization approaches. We also provide the audience with a solid background and comprehensive description of stochastic geometry modelingby introducing key theoremsby explaining how to formulate problems from the standpoint of system-level analysis and optimization, as well as by illustrating how to use stochastic geometry for modeling and analyzing cellular networks based on the novel concept of multi-tenancy network slicing. Finally, we point out the future research directions to embrace new open-source function/resource allocation procedures.

    Marco Di RenzoMarco Di Renzo is a frequent tutorial speaker and lecturer at IEEE international conferences. During the last three years, he has presented 12 tutorials on “Spatial Modulation for MIMO Systems” (WCNC 2013, EW 2013, ICC 2013, VTC-Spring 2013 VTC-Fall 2013, CAMAD 2013, WCCN 2014, EW 2014, EUSIPCO 2014, PIMRC 2014, VTC-Fall 2014, ATC 2014), 7 tutorials on “Energy-Efficient Wireless Networks” (MASCOTS 2014, VTC-Fall 2014, CCNC 2014, CCNC 2015, GLOBECOM 2015, WCNC 2016, IEEE ICC 2016), 10 tutorials on “Stochastic Geometry Modeling and Analysis of Wireless Networks” (VTC-Spring 2015, EW 2015, ICC 2015, ICCC 2015, ICUWB 2015, ComManTel 2015, CCNC 2016, VTC-Spring 2016, CAMAD 2016, ICNC 2017), and 6 tutorials on “Energy-Neutral Wireless Networks Design” at EW 2016, EuCNC 2016, EUSIPCO 2016, ISWSC 2016, PIMRC 2016, GLOBECOM 2016. He was an invited panelist on “Spatial Modulation for Green Networks” at IEEE WCNC 2013.

    Fabrizio GranelliFabrizio Granelli is a well-known tutorial and seminar speaker, and was IEEE ComSoc Distinguished Lecturer in the years 2012-15, covering topics related to wireless and green networking. In the last years, he gave 7 tutorials on “Energy-Efficient Wireless Networks” (MASCOTS 2014, VTC-Fall 2014, CCNC 2014, CCNC 2015, GLOBECOM 2015, WCNC 2016, IEEE ICC 2016). In 2016 he was visiting professor at the University of Tokyo (Japan) for speeches and training activities on 5G virtualization; he presented a keynote speech on “Virtualization and 5G Networks” at the IEEE ICC 2016 Workshop on “Novel Medium Access and Resource Allocation for 5G Networks”. He is currently preparing an online course for the IEEE Communications Society on “Greening the Internet”, which will be held for the first time in October 2016.

    Konstantinos SamdanisKonstantinos Samdanis has presented 3 tutorials on “Energy-Efficient and Green Communications” (IEEE VTC-Spring 2011, IEEE CCNC 2012, IEEE NOMS 2012) and 4 tutorial on “Virtualization and Network Slicing Solutions” in ACM MSWIM 2016, IEEE WCNC 2017, IEEE ICC 2017 and IEEE Globecom 2017. He also presented a tutorial on “Energy efficiency and mobile backhaul” on MPLS+SDN+NFV World Congress 2013 as an ambassador of Broadband Forum (BBF). Konstantinos had experience in providing Summer school and educational tutorials on “mobile backhaul” for the CROSSFIRE European project in 2014 and on “network virtualization” at the 2nd International Summer School on Emerging Architectures and Key Technologies for 5G Networks.

    Vincenzo SciancaleporeVincenzo Sciancalepore had 4 tutorials on network slicing issues and solutions at ACM MSWIM 2016, IEEE WCNC 2017, IEEE ICC 2017 and IEEE Globecom 2017. He has also given a keynote on “The Network Slicing concept: past, present and future” at the 5G Cell-Less Nets workshop co-located with ISWCS 2017.